9 Armies of the World With the Strictest Discipline

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We usually recall the word "discipline" when we speak of the army or military forces of any country. The strict schedule they follow makes them stand apart from any common man, and it’s the reason why a mere look at them gives us a feeling of pride and patriotism.

We at Bright Side have collated a list of the world’s most disciplined and strictest armies that we all must be proud of.

9. The Chinese People’s Liberation Army

© REX/HAP/Quirky China News

© eastnews

As the world’s largest military force, China’s armed forces are a group of the most disciplined and well-trained personnel. It is compulsory to join the army in China (however, it is generally not followed considering the huge number of armed forces in the country).

The military training facility, Zhurihe base, provides realistic battle conditions to recruits to help them perform well on the field.

8. NAVSOG & CGSOG of the Philippines

Training at  DTU, 10th Infantry Division, Philippine Army - 10th Infantry Agila Division Philippine Army

If you thought it’s only about physical discipline, you are more than wrong. Get to know the Naval Special Operations Group (NAVSOG) and Coast Guard Special Operations Group (CGSOG) who also ask their men to perform after getting drunk.

It’s not only physical skill but also mental will that need to be proved. They have also started admitting women into their forces, and they also have to abide by the rule of gaining both physical and mental strength. And if you think it’s some sort of booze party, here’s their morning regime: running 6 miles, swimming 18 miles at a stretch without any rest, and target shooting. And you thought a lemonade would be enough to fix your hangover!

7. US Navy SEALs

Navy Seal trainees rush the beach under orders in this undated photo taken in 2000 at the Coronado Naval Amphibious Base in San Diego, California. Hell Week at this beach in San Diego is exactly what it sounds like for third-week Navy trainees who are subjected to nearly unimaginable physical and mental trials. Only the strongest survive the nonstop physical exercise of jogging for miles in deep sand, carrying heavy rubber boats back and forth through the surf, crawling through mud under simulated machine gun fire, and doing myriads of pushups on demand. Hunger, thirst and hallucinations are among the symptoms the men experience, often after only two days. The recruits are divided into teams, and if a team fails to complete a task in the allotted time, all its members must carry 'Old Misery,' a 350-pound log.  Fewer than half the men survive the week to become Seals, an elite maritime commando force.  (Photo by Joe McNally/Getty Images)

The US Navy SEALs, the killers of Bin Laden, are known for their courage and strength. But if you think it’s just another job in a country’s armed force, you are completely wrong. No matter how transparent and public the training of a Navy SEAL is, some recruits still don’t manage to clear it, and there is a dropout of almost 75-80% by the time training ends. It’s no wonder that they also have some amazing statistics. In the Vietnam War, the combined kill ratio for team 1 and 2 was 200 to 1.

And don’t go by their name as they not only operate in water but equally well elsewhere. The word SEAL itself stands for "Sea, Air, and Land." There are 8 SEAL teams in total, but official sources refuse to agree upon the existence of 6 and 9.

6. The Indian Army

TOPSHOT - An Indian army training cadet rides a horse as they jump through a ring of fire during a combined display at an Officer Training Academy in Chennai on September 9, 2016, ahead of a visit by India's President Pranab Mukherjee who is scheduled to review a passing out parade of cadets on September 10. / AFP / ARUN SANKAR        (Photo credit should read ARUN SANKAR/AFP/Getty Images)

The Indian army is synonymous with the word "discipline." The cadets can’t evade the toughest of training schedules, which are scientifically crafted for the GCs (Gentleman Cadets) to develop their physical and mental attributes. The physical training includes drills, sports, equitation, and swimming. They are taught to work as a team at all times.

Some of the tough punishments during training include Maharaja (lifting your body vertically by the support of your head), crawling in a wired trench, and cold watercrawling.

5. Israel’s Shayetet 13

there are no rules.  / AFP / MENAHEM KAHANA        (Photo credit should read MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)

Often compared with Delta Force and US Navy SEALs, Israel’s Shayetet 13 is one of the most efficient military forces in the world. It is also the most secretive in Israel’s defense force. Theirs is a 20-month training. In addition to firearms and heavy weapons training, they are taught the national martial art of Israel: Krav Maga.

So before you plan to mess with the Shayetet 13, read their unofficial motto that is a popular joke among them: "When the going gets tough, the Jews get pissed."

4. Britain’s MI6

© UK Army

The MI6 call themselves boring, but that’s only if you consider recruiting agents around the world for the collection and analysis of secret human intelligence as boring. Also known as Britain’s Secret Intelligence Service (SIS), they work closely with MI5.

They have an agent similar to Agent “Q,“ who looks after all the equipment and weaponry involved in each operation. As far as the word ”discipline" goes, one can very well imagine the life of a spy. It’s secretive, it’s tough, and it’s definitely a highly disciplined job.

3. North Korea’s Storm Corp Soldiers

A North Korean military honor guard marches past during a welcome ceremony for European Council President and Swedish Prime Minister Goran Persson at Pyongyang airport, 02 May 2001.  Persson is leading a European Union delegation on a three-day visit to North Korea for talks aimed at helping the ailing peace process for the Korean peninsula.  (Photo credit should read GREG BAKER/AFP/Getty Images)

When talking of North Korea, you might draw an image of the most disciplined country in the world. With the utmost discipline followed by citizens, army men are a level up. North Korea never openly declared who the Storm Corps are or how they work, but their training and discipline stories will send a chill down your spine.

Fighting 3-15 opponents at once, punching a tree 5,000 times back to back, punching a tin can until their hands rip apart, and then punching into salt are some of the training regimes disclosed by the soldiers themselves. It is said that you don’t recognize a Storm Corp agent by looking at him but by shaking hands with him. Their hands are as hard as stone.

2. Russia’s Spetsnaz

© Amazon

The Russian army believes that where there is war, there is certainly pain. Thus, they train their army to endure pain with as much ease as possible. A burning concrete slabis smashed in half on a trainee’s stomach, they get punched in the stomachby a commanding officer, and they are not allowed to show any sign of pain at all.

Spetsnaz are also given training in self-defense and martial arts.

1. South Africa’s Elite Military

Security is tight for the Nelson Mandela funeral with the Army and Police on full display, Qunu, South Africa, 14 December 2014. An icon of democracy, Mandela was buried at his family home in Qunu after passing away on the 5th December 2013. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images.)

South Africa’s elite forces are another example of tough physical and mental training. Not all make it to the end of training, largely due to the amount of discipline and strictness involved in the training process. To get yourself into the training camp, there is a tough selection process: applicants are given no food and are not allowed to sleep. Only those who have the will get through this selection process.

And this is just the beginning. The trainees perform bush marching, receive food every 5 days, and have to sleep in a standing position to keep hyenas away. Apart from other regular training activities, they are also required to pass parachute training.

Strictness from the past: The Z Special Unit of Australia

© Edwards, Reg J/Wikimedia

They existed for just 4 years, but the story of how disciplined and proactive Z Force was lives on. Australia established the Z Special Unit during the Second World War to keep a check on and ward off any kind of threat from Japan in the Pacific waters. They performed a total of 81 operations while being undercover wearing sarongs.

Another thing that was dreadful about them was their mock attacks in towns near Fraser Island. Stories of the Z Special Force even led to the making of the Australian TV series Spyforce. Operation Jaywick in Singapore Harbor is considered their most daring act, in which they took over Japanese shipping.

Bonus: These kids have been learning army-like discipline since childhood. Have a look.

© eastnews

Who are they?

If you thought there was a set age to join the army, you should take another look at the image above. These are the students at Yang Dezhi Red Army Elementary School in Wenshui, Guizhou Province. The school is funded by China’s Red Nobility, which is revolution-era Communist Commanders and their families.

As it is mandatory in China to join the army, many more schools like this one are preparing their future soldiers across the country. This practice has often been criticized for being a brainwashing activity undertaken for schoolchildren. The children shown here are relaxing their eyes after a training regime.

Being an army man isn’t easy. It comes with a set of hardships and dedication. However, the pride and feel-good factor associated with it is priceless. Know a friend serving in the army? Share their experience in the comments section below.

Preview photo credit East News

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